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20121227
20121227
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
is ongoing, on december 28 this year, the pentagon renewed its formal threats against us in relation to ongoing publishing, but also extremely seriously in relation to ongoing, what they call, solicitation. that is asking sources publicly , send us important material and we will publish it. they say that itself is a crime. this is not simply a case about we received some information back in 2010 and have been publishing it, and they say that was the crime. the pentagon is maintaining a line that wikileaks inherently as an institution held military and government whistleblowers to come forward with this information as a crime. >> talk more, michael ratner, about the emails of stratford. >> as you have covered on the show before, they had a lot of important information about surveillance of everybody from peta to the yesmen, to u.s. government agencies. it puts out a regular intelligence newsletter. it does not work for private clients by major corporations, etc.. one of the things that came out and the stratfor emails are listed people who apparently are subscribers to the newsletter,
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, pau
to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before he became secretary of state. whener's paper, which are i read a few years ago, i thought it was the most remarkable document ever to emerge from washington in the last few years. looking at the emerging eco
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)